[30 Builds] Day 24

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    HTML-Kit Support, 31st Aug 2013 11:43 pm

    TreeHouse build 20130813 posted.

    http://www.htmlkit.com/assistant/

    • Check CSS for typos and common errors. To use this feature, open a
      *.css file and click "Validate CSS" option on the bottom. Also supports
      validating only the selected CSS.

    Chami

    • Dave P, 1st Sep 2013 8:05 am

      On 9/1/2013 12:43 AM, HTML-Kit Support wrote:

      TreeHouse build 20130813 posted.

      http://www.htmlkit.com/assistant/

      • Check CSS for typos and common errors. To use this feature, open a
        *.css file and click "Validate CSS" option on the bottom. Also supports
        validating only the selected CSS.

      Chami

      Very nice and very convenient.
      Dave

      • HTML-Kit Support, 1st Sep 2013 1:08 pm

        On 9/1/2013 8:05 AM, Dave Pyles wrote:

        On 9/1/2013 12:43 AM, HTML-Kit Support wrote:

        TreeHouse build 20130813 posted.

        http://www.htmlkit.com/assistant/

        • Check CSS for typos and common errors. To use this feature, open a
          *.css file and click "Validate CSS" option on the bottom. Also supports
          validating only the selected CSS.

        Chami

        Very nice and very convenient.
        Dave

        Thanks Dave. I need help documenting all this stuff!

        Chami

        • Dave P, 1st Sep 2013 2:27 pm

          On 9/1/2013 2:08 PM, HTML-Kit Support wrote:

          On 9/1/2013 8:05 AM, Dave Pyles wrote:

          On 9/1/2013 12:43 AM, HTML-Kit Support wrote:

          TreeHouse build 20130813 posted.

          http://www.htmlkit.com/assistant/

          • Check CSS for typos and common errors. To use this feature, open a
            *.css file and click "Validate CSS" option on the bottom. Also supports
            validating only the selected CSS.

          Chami

          Very nice and very convenient.
          Dave

          Thanks Dave. I need help documenting all this stuff!

          Chami

          Documenting as is writing usage instructions, or documenting as in just
          making sure it works? I think the brief instructions you are including
          at http://www.htmlkit.com/blog/30-builds-in-30-days/ are fine for
          telling folks how to use the new stuff.

          Dave

          • HTML-Kit Support, 1st Sep 2013 3:27 pm

            On 9/1/2013 2:27 PM, Dave Pyles wrote:

            On 9/1/2013 2:08 PM, HTML-Kit Support wrote:

            On 9/1/2013 8:05 AM, Dave Pyles wrote:

            On 9/1/2013 12:43 AM, HTML-Kit Support wrote:

            TreeHouse build 20130813 posted.

            http://www.htmlkit.com/assistant/

            • Check CSS for typos and common errors. To use this feature, open a
              *.css file and click "Validate CSS" option on the bottom. Also supports
              validating only the selected CSS.

            Chami

            Very nice and very convenient.
            Dave

            Thanks Dave. I need help documenting all this stuff!

            Chami

            Documenting as is writing usage instructions, or documenting as in
            just making sure it works? I think the brief instructions you are
            including at http://www.htmlkit.com/blog/30-builds-in-30-days/ are
            fine for telling folks how to use the new stuff.

            Dave

            Just haven't had much time to do long posts so I'm glad you think the
            summary is enough for now.

            I thought it might be good to write a few blog posts at the end of 30
            days with screenshots of new options. Maybe even do a video or two
            showing how Screen Capture and preview resolutions work. Things like
            various validators, beautifiers and minimizers could be combined by file
            type or function.

            The Screen Capture utility was added before everything else hoping to
            create slides for each update but didn't get to use it at all!

            Chami

    • Charles, 1st Sep 2013 11:23 am

      On 9/1/2013 12:43 AM, HTML-Kit Support wrote:

      TreeHouse build 20130813 posted.

      http://www.htmlkit.com/assistant/

      • Check CSS for typos and common errors. To use this feature, open a
        *.css file and click "Validate CSS" option on the bottom. Also supports
        validating only the selected CSS.

      Chami

      Very convenient. However, I don't understand why it reports "Don't use
      IDs in selectors". If I have a div with an ID of some name, I know of
      no other way to identify the properties of that div. I could use class
      but for one time use I thought using ID was more proper.

      Am I missing something?

      Charles

      • HTML-Kit Support, 1st Sep 2013 1:05 pm

        On 9/1/2013 11:23 AM, Charles wrote:

        On 9/1/2013 12:43 AM, HTML-Kit Support wrote:

        TreeHouse build 20130813 posted.

        http://www.htmlkit.com/assistant/

        • Check CSS for typos and common errors. To use this feature, open
          a *.css file and click "Validate CSS" option on the bottom. Also
          supports validating only the selected CSS.

        Chami

        Very convenient. However, I don't understand why it reports "Don't
        use IDs in selectors". If I have a div with an ID of some name, I
        know of no other way to identify the properties of that div. I could
        use class but for one time use I thought using ID was more proper.

        Am I missing something?

        Charles

        There's a lot of room for coding style preferences and opinions in web
        development and you're going to get some of that in validation tools
        like CSSLint, JSLint, HTML Tidy, and even W3C validators.

        It also matters whether you're the only coder or if the code is
        shared/maintained by others. You might also be using intermediate tools
        in which case some of these best-practices apply more to the original
        source and less to the output.

        So why classes over IDs in CSS selectors? Classes are easy to reuse,
        they can be combined, less likely to clash with other uses like IDs in
        anchors/frameworks, IDs may inadvertently "overrule" classes, etc.

        Virtually no sufficiently large CSS file is going to adhere to all of
        these guidelines but they may help improve future projects. They're
        listed as warnings and you'll see an errors section for slightly more
        fatal issues.

        Chami

        • Charles, 1st Sep 2013 3:00 pm

          On 9/1/2013 2:05 PM, HTML-Kit Support wrote:

          On 9/1/2013 11:23 AM, Charles wrote:

          On 9/1/2013 12:43 AM, HTML-Kit Support wrote:

          TreeHouse build 20130813 posted.

          http://www.htmlkit.com/assistant/

          • Check CSS for typos and common errors. To use this feature, open
            a *.css file and click "Validate CSS" option on the bottom. Also
            supports validating only the selected CSS.

          Chami

          Very convenient. However, I don't understand why it reports "Don't
          use IDs in selectors". If I have a div with an ID of some name, I
          know of no other way to identify the properties of that div. I could
          use class but for one time use I thought using ID was more proper.

          Am I missing something?

          Charles

          There's a lot of room for coding style preferences and opinions in web
          development and you're going to get some of that in validation tools
          like CSSLint, JSLint, HTML Tidy, and even W3C validators.

          It also matters whether you're the only coder or if the code is
          shared/maintained by others. You might also be using intermediate tools
          in which case some of these best-practices apply more to the original
          source and less to the output.

          So why classes over IDs in CSS selectors? Classes are easy to reuse,
          they can be combined, less likely to clash with other uses like IDs in
          anchors/frameworks, IDs may inadvertently "overrule" classes, etc.

          Virtually no sufficiently large CSS file is going to adhere to all of
          these guidelines but they may help improve future projects. They're
          listed as warnings and you'll see an errors section for slightly more
          fatal issues.

          Chami

          Thanks, Chami, for your explanation. I suppose that your third
          paragraph makes a lot of sense. I will have to keep this is mind. It
          is just that everything I have learned in the past makes heavy use of
          the ID. Maybe I haven't been keeping up with the latest.

          As a refresher and also to learn what is new, I am starting a 5 week
          course on HTML5 and CSS3. Will see if the teacher has changed her
          position on this subject (I've had her before so know the methods that
          she teaches).

          I like this addition to Tools as changes can be made right there where
          the error is highlighted.

          Thanks again and your 30 days are fast coming to a close.

          Charles

          • HTML-Kit Support, 1st Sep 2013 3:36 pm

            On 9/1/2013 3:00 PM, Charles wrote:

            On 9/1/2013 2:05 PM, HTML-Kit Support wrote:

            On 9/1/2013 11:23 AM, Charles wrote:

            On 9/1/2013 12:43 AM, HTML-Kit Support wrote:

            TreeHouse build 20130813 posted.

            http://www.htmlkit.com/assistant/

            • Check CSS for typos and common errors. To use this feature, open
              a *.css file and click "Validate CSS" option on the bottom. Also
              supports validating only the selected CSS.

            Chami

            Very convenient. However, I don't understand why it reports "Don't
            use IDs in selectors". If I have a div with an ID of some name, I
            know of no other way to identify the properties of that div. I could
            use class but for one time use I thought using ID was more proper.

            Am I missing something?

            Charles

            There's a lot of room for coding style preferences and opinions in web
            development and you're going to get some of that in validation tools
            like CSSLint, JSLint, HTML Tidy, and even W3C validators.

            It also matters whether you're the only coder or if the code is
            shared/maintained by others. You might also be using intermediate tools
            in which case some of these best-practices apply more to the original
            source and less to the output.

            So why classes over IDs in CSS selectors? Classes are easy to reuse,
            they can be combined, less likely to clash with other uses like IDs in
            anchors/frameworks, IDs may inadvertently "overrule" classes, etc.

            Virtually no sufficiently large CSS file is going to adhere to all of
            these guidelines but they may help improve future projects. They're
            listed as warnings and you'll see an errors section for slightly more
            fatal issues.

            Chami

            Thanks, Chami, for your explanation. I suppose that your third
            paragraph makes a lot of sense. I will have to keep this is mind. It
            is just that everything I have learned in the past makes heavy use of
            the ID. Maybe I haven't been keeping up with the latest.

            As a refresher and also to learn what is new, I am starting a 5 week
            course on HTML5 and CSS3. Will see if the teacher has changed her
            position on this subject (I've had her before so know the methods that
            she teaches).

            I like this addition to Tools as changes can be made right there where
            the error is highlighted.

            Thanks again and your 30 days are fast coming to a close.

            Charles

            Oh it'll be so sweet sleeping for two days :)

            I'd be interested to know how your course goes. A lot has changed
            specially if you include various frameworks into the mix.

            Chami